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Transportation Alternatives Data Exchange (TrADE)

TA Factsheets

Activity #2


activity02

Safe Routes for Non-Drivers

The federal Transportation Enhancements (TA) program funds 10 different types of transportation-related activities. Through activity 2, Safe routes for non-drivers, communities develop projects that create or improve access for individuals who do not drive.  These programs allow children, older adults and individuals with disabilities to access daily needs.  This is a new activity under the 2012 MAP-21 transportation bill.
 

Eligible Projects 

Working within Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) guidelines, each state Department of Transportation (DOT) determines the eligibility of TA projects for funding. This is a new activity under the 2012 MAP-21 transportation bill. Communities should be creative in considering ways to improve the ability of non-drivers to access daily needs, such as schools, clinics, libraries, markets, and public transportation. 

 

Examples of Successful Projects

In Glendale, Arizona, $77,600 was used to assemble and distribute safety and educational materials to all local elementary schools, libraries, and youth organizations. The comprehensive bicycle education program includes materials for teachers and youth leaders to teach 8-13 year olds about bicycle safety. These “Bike Boxes” included a step-by-step trainer’s manual, instructional equipment, safety videos, a bicycle helmet, children’s worksheets, and more. The project was sponsored by the City of Glendale and the project received the Golden Spoke Award for the 2004 Valley Metro Clear Air Campaign.
Glendale Bike Box
In Glendale, Arizona, $77,600 was used to assemble and distribute safety and educational materials to all local elementary schools, libraries, and youth organizations. The comprehensive bicycle education program includes materials for teachers and youth leaders to teach 8-13 year olds about bicycle safety. These “Bike Boxes” included a step-by-step trainer’s manual, instructional equipment, safety videos, a bicycle helmet, children’s worksheets, and more. The project was sponsored by the City of Glendale and the project received the Golden Spoke Award for the 2004 Valley Metro Clear Air Campaign.
In 1995, Kirkland, Wash., became the first U.S. city to implement a pedestrian flag program when it started PedFlag to reduce the number of pedestrian injuries and deaths. The program provides flags at more than 50 crosswalks throughout the city for pedestrians to carry as they cross the street, thereby increasing their visibility to cars. The City of Kirkland maintains the flags at downtown locations, and the other sites are maintained by citizen volunteers.

In 2006, the PedFlag program received TE funds, under Category 2, to develop, implement, and increase the use of pedestrian flags at crosswalks. The study resulted in a flag redesign, and strategies for program promotion and partnerships with local businesses. Federal Award: $60,000; Local Match: $0; Total: $60,000
Check out this news story about the PedFlag program on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FAy4Bxo6FTg

Photo credit: City of Kirkland

In 1995, Kirkland, Wash., became the first U.S. city to implement a pedestrian flag program when it started PedFlag to reduce the number of pedestrian injuries and deaths. The program provides flags at more than 50 crosswalks throughout the city for pedestrians to carry as they cross the street, thereby increasing their visibility to cars. The City of Kirkland maintains the flags at downtown locations, and the other sites are maintained by citizen volunteers. <br />
<br />
In 2006, the PedFlag program received TE funds, under Category 2,  to develop, implement, and increase the use of pedestrian flags at crosswalks. The study resulted in a flag redesign, and strategies for program promotion and partnerships with local businesses. Federal Award: $60,000; Local Match: $0; Total: $60,000<br />
<br />
For more information about the PedFlag program, visit: <a href="http://www.ci.kirkland.wa.us/depart/Public_Works/Transportation___Streets/Pedestrian_Flags_-_FAQs.htm">http://www.ci.kirkland.wa.us/depart/Public_Works/Transportation___Streets/Pedestrian_Flags_-_FAQs.htm</a><br />
<br />
Check out this news story about the PedFlag program on YouTube: <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FAy4Bxo6FTg">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FAy4Bxo6FTg</a><br />
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Photo credit: City of Kirkland

Kirkland, Washington Flag Program.

*Please note: Educational programs are only eligible for projects relating to children in grades K-8.

Visit http://trade.railstotrails.org/project_examples for additional project examples.

Federal Guidance

Projects that use TA funds must qualify as one or more of the 10 designated activities and be related to surface transportation in order to meet basic federal eligibility requirements. FHWA TA Guidance defines non-drivers to include children, older adults, and individuals with disabilities. It also mentions connections to public transportation and access to daily needs for non-drivers. 

http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/map21/guidance/guidetap.cfm for a full copy of the Guidance.



Project Funding

Most states require TA sponsors to provide at least 20 percent of project costs, also referred to as matching funds. In many states, the value of donated property, materials and services, the labor of state and local government employees, and the costs of preliminary engineering may count towards the matching requirement. Federal, non-DOT funds can often be used as matching funds.  Check with your state TE manager whether these innovative financing options are available in your state.  Additional funds for this activity may come from state health agencies or other state agencies, local governments, schools, businesses, foundations, service and nonprofit organizations or other federal sources. 

Visit
http://trade.railstotrails.org/funding_sources for more suggestions on potential funding sources.

Related Resources

   FHWAs Bicycle and Pedestrian Program: http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/environment/bicycle_pedestrian/ or 202-366-9064

   The National Center for Bicycling and Walking: www.bikewalk.org or 202-223-3621

   Walk to School Week: http://www.walkbiketoschool.org/

   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Nutrition & Physical Activity: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpao/ or 800-232-4636


To Get Started

Inquiries about the TA application process should be directed to the TA manager at your state DOT.
Visit
http://trade.railstotrails.org/contact for TA manager contact information.  

 

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